Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | (Page 2)

    0 0

    ‘Louise Nicholas’s The List of Last Remaining very satisfyingly brings together a substantial body of her work. Its five, intelligently ordered sections each rise up to enact their shimmering, persuasive world and then fade out to make way for the … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘Modulation is here used in its musical sense of changing key. But the dominant metaphor of the Graphology Poems — the home key, if you will — is the concept of graphology itself. Like other WA poets such as Nandi … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘The List of Last Remaining is a book that deserves to be read more than once. While it contains many very fine individual poems, its greatest strength is perhaps how well the poems work together, how each section creates a … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘“Graphology”, Kinsella reminds us in his introductory notes, is a pseudoscience that claims that aspects of personality can be deduced by analysing a person’s handwriting. It requires an examination of form, movement and use of space, all of which are … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘[Rowland] encourages the reader to honour and seek that which nurtures the human spirit, even in reflection of loss, rather than that which neuters connection and denies the intimacy that lies between human and human, human and earth.’ The full … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘Like the landscapes Kinsella so often writes about, Graphology Poems is sprawling, sometimes messy, often imposing, and always compelling.’ ‘These lines of poetry are by a writer utterly taken up with the materiality of language, and by the intense, sometimes … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘In his writing, Kinsella is equipped with mercurial turns of phrase, great breadth of reference, skilled and charismatic daring, prolix volubility and topical range.’ ‘If readers find in Kinsella and Graphology any fixed idea […] it might simply be a … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘In the poems of Opera, Stuart Cooke attempts to take the writing of place into new territory, and in doing so, accomplishes something remarkable. This collection is both substantial and complex, enhancing our understanding of what a poetics of landscape … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘Kinsella’s concerns are also about marshalling a sense of the world’s never-containable, protean indeterminacies, channelling them into what one might call the real-unreal of poetic utterance; an utterance that, in Kinsella’s hands is always trying to address large and small … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘The List of Last Remaining by Louise Nicholas is a collection full of depth and diversity, a narrative of fractures in time where people and places mirror each other and become windows into the human condition.’ The full review, published … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘The sheer width of Kinsella’s anti-pastoral, eco-poetic wordscapes is a delight and challenge to the reader.’ The full review, published in Tears in the Fence (UK), can be found here. Graphology Poems: 1995–2015 can be purchased here.

    0 0

    ‘[Lyn’s] awareness of the natural world, the wonder of it, permeates the whole collection: the earth and everything in it, and everything on it is her text, how all of it’s connected, all of it is to be celebrated, insect, … Continue reading

    0 0

    ‘In Opera parts of the world appear, and as readers we are placed amongst them as Cooke’s music teaches us how we might sing and move as one of a chorus.’ The full review, published in Plumwood Mountain, can be … Continue reading

older | 1 | (Page 2)